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Disruption in the Legal Industry Flows from Clients

Disruption Legal Industry Clients

“Disruption does not come from industry. Disruption will not come from law firms. Disruption comes, and is already coming, from our customers.”

The topic of “disruption” has been, well, disruptive in the legal world last few weeks. On one side of the scales, events like Reinvent Law, LexThink.1, and conference on “disruptive innovation” which was held at Harvard Law.

Writing for Legal Technology News, Bob Ambrogi underscored the contrast between the lineage of the venue, with the topic at hand:

Talk of disruptive innovation, alternative law firm business models, and the future of the legal profession filled the venerable, 131-year-old halls of Harvard Law School’s Austin Hall yesterday, as the school’s Program on the Legal Profession hosted a conference on disruptive innovation in the market for legal services.

On the other side of the scale are thinkers like Sam Glover of Lawyerist with a thoughtful, if not more slightly more tempered viewpoint:

Law practice is also, at heart, a personal-service industry. (Nobody talks about disrupting the massage industry — at least not that I have ever heard of.) Related “The Problem with Disruption and Law Practice #ABATechShow” There are a lot of reasons why it is especially hard to disrupt an industry like this. It may be impossible. And that may be a good thing.

Looking forward, there’s the likes of Gartner Research, a large technology research consulting firm, which recently published a forward looking report: IT Planning Guidance for Legal Professionals: The Gartner Legal IT 2020 ScenarioDaniel Martin Katz, an associate professor of law at Michigan State University, honed in on the report’s predictions for law schools.

In the white board video posted nearby, which runs under five minutes, Christopher T. Anderson argues, “The debate misses the real point. Disruption does not come from industry. Disruption will not come from law firms. Disruption comes, and is already coming, from our customers.”

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About Frank Strong

Frank Strong
Frank Strong is the communications director with Business of Law Software Solutions (BLSS) a division of LexisNexis. In this capacity he directs communications strategy and execution in support of BLSS products including those for large law, small law and corporate counsel. With 15 years in experience in the marketing communications for the high-tech sector, Strong previously served as director of PR for Vocus, which develops marketing, PR and media monitoring software. He’s held multiple roles in PR both in-house with corporations, and has also endured the rigors of billable hours, having completed gigs at PR firms both large and small. A veteran with two deployments, Strong has concurrently served in uniform in reserve components of the military for 20 years, initially as an enlisted Marine and later as an Army officer. Strong holds a BA in Film and TV production from Worcester State University, an M.A. in Public Communication from American University, and an M.B.A. from Marymount University.
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  1. […] In conjunction to the report Christopher T. Anderson argues, “The debate misses the real point. Disruption does not come from industry. Disruption will not come from law firms. Disruption comes, and is already coming, from our customers.” Source […]